Sleep Disorders News -- ScienceDaily
High blood pressure limits protection to vital organs and tissues in low-oxygen conditions
New research sheds light on the effects of high blood pressure by considering the way the body responds to a lack of oxygen.
Understanding a fly's body temperature may help people sleep better
In findings that one day may help people sleep better, scientists have uncovered the first molecular evidence that two anciently conserved proteins in the brains of insects and mammals share a common biological ancestry as regulators of body temperature rhythms crucial to metabolism and sleep. The scientists study fruit flies (Drosophila) and mice to solve mysteries about body temperature rhythms in insects and mammals.
Slow eating speed may be linked to weight loss
Slowing down the speed at which you eat, along with cutting out after dinner snacks and not eating within two hours of going to sleep may all help to shed the pounds, suggests new research.
Sleepless in Latin America: Blind cavefish, extreme environments and insomnia
A new study has found that differences in the production of the neuropeptide Hypocretin, previously implicated in human narcolepsy, may explain variation in sleep between animal species, or even between individual people. It may also provide important insight into the evolution of sleep and how we might build a brain that does not need to sleep.
Specific neurons trigger waking due to inhaled carbon dioxide
Researchers have shown that a group of neurons responsible for arousal are directly triggered by carbon dioxide and cause mice to wake up without any changes to breathing.
Body clock disruptions occur years before memory loss in Alzheimer’s
People with Alzheimer’s disease have disturbances in their internal body clocks that affect the sleep/wake cycle and may increase risk of developing the disorder. Researchers have found that such circadian rhythm disruptions also occur much earlier in people whose memories are intact but whose brain scans show early, preclinical evidence of Alzheimer’s.
Sixty-four percent of women suffer from insomnia in late pregnancy
A new study warns that health systems need to address the problem of insomnia in pregnancy systematically, since as well as affecting the quality of life of pregnant women, insomnia is a risk factor for high blood pressure and pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, depression, preterm birth and unplanned caesarean sections.
Quality of children's sleep may affect eating habits and weight
Several measures of poor sleep quality were associated with higher body mass index (BMI) in children, according to new data.
Amid ADHD spike, doctors urge closer look at sleep issues
Amid a steady rise in the number of children diagnosed with ADHD, debate is brewing whether the condition may be a sleep disorder.
Sleep apnea after stroke heightens risk of another stroke; death
Stroke survivors, especially Mexican-Americans, whose sleep is interrupted by pauses in breathing (sleep apnea) are more likely to die or experience another stroke, according to preliminary research.
Americans are getting more ZZZZs
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye.
Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits£ Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.
Bright light therapy improves sleep in people treated for cancer
Results of a randomized controlled trial suggest that systematic bright light exposure can improve sleep for fatigued people who have been treated for cancer.
Newborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain function
Neuroscientists have found that even a brief episode of immune system activation within days of birth can cause persistent changes in sleep patterns concurrent with increases in epilepsy-like brain activity -- a combination of symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions.
Can writing your 'to-do's' help you to doze£ Study suggests jotting down tasks can
Writing a 'to-do' list at bedtime may aid in falling asleep, according to a new study. Research compared sleep patterns of participants who took five minutes to write down upcoming duties versus participants who chronicled completed activities.
Housework gender differences may affect health in elderly men and women
Elderly men across Europe and the US spend less time on housework than elderly women, according to a new study. Researchers found that elderly women on average spent almost five hours a day doing housework compared to only around three hours a day for elderly men.
Sleeping for longer leads to a healthier diet
Sleeping for longer each night is a simple lifestyle intervention that could help reduce intake of sugary foods and lead to a generally healthier diet, according to a new study.
General anesthetics do more than put you to sleep
A new understanding of the complex ways in which general anesthetics act on the brain could eventually lead to improved drugs for surgery. It remains unclear how general anesthesia works, even though it is one of the most common medical procedures worldwide. University of Queensland researcher, Associate Professor Bruno van Swinderen, said his team had overturned previous understanding of what general anaesthetics do to the brain, finding the drugs did much more than induce sleep.
People who sleep less than 8 hours a night more likely to suffer from depression, anxiety
Sleeping less than the recommended eight hours a night is associated with intrusive, repetitive thoughts like those seen in anxiety or depression, according to new research.
Scheduled feeding improves neurodegenerative symptoms in mice
Restricting meals to the same time each day improves motor activity and sleep quality in a mouse model of Huntington's disease, according to new research. These findings suggest that eating on a strict schedule could improve quality of life for patients with neurodegenerative diseases for which there are no known cures.
With wrist-worn gadget, researchers capture real-life sleep for the first time
To measure a person's sleep, researchers have relied on costly and time-consuming approaches that could only be used in a sleep lab. But now researchers have found a way to capture detailed information on human sleep cycles over long periods of time while individuals slumber at home. According to the researchers, it will now be possible to objectively capture the real-life sleep habits and sleep quality of large numbers of people.
Preterm infants have narrowed upper airways, which may explain higher obstructive sleep apnea risk
A multidisciplinary team used MRI to determine that the risk factors that lead to obstructive sleep apena are confined to the uppermost airway and do not appear to be explained by enlarged adenoids and tonsils.
Weekly fish consumption linked to better sleep, higher IQ
Regular fish consumption has been shown to improve cognition. It's also been known to help with sleep. A new study connects all three for the first time. The team found that children who eat fish at least once a week sleep better and have higher IQs by an average of 4 points.
Seeing gene influencing performance of sleep-deprived people
Researchers have discovered a genetic variation that predicts how well people perform certain mental tasks when they are sleep deprived. For the first time, their research shows individuals with a particular variation of the DRD2 gene are resilient to the effects of sleep deprivation when completing tasks that require cognitive flexibility.
Some newborns with chronic illness show signs of serious sleep problems at birth
New parents often hear about how important sleep is for their babies' development -- but some newborns may have more serious sleep challenges than others. A new study finds that babies with spina bifida have early symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing that could contribute to lifelong issues with neurodevelopment.
What factors affect quality of life in older patients with cancer£
A new study provides insights on the factors that affect health-related quality of life in older adults with cancer. The findings support the importance of addressing persistent symptoms, managing comorbidities, promoting leisure-time physical activity, and addressing financial challenges.
Amber-tinted glasses may provide relief for insomnia
A new method to reduce the adverse effects of evening ambient light exposure, while still allowing use of blue light-emitting devices has now been tested by researchers.
Offbeat brainwaves during sleep make older adults forget
Like swinging a tennis racket during a ball toss to serve an ace, slow and speedy brainwaves during deep sleep must sync up at exactly the right moment to hit the save button on new memories, according to new research.
Stressed-out worms hit the snooze button
When you catch a nasty cold, curling up in bed to sleep may be the only activity you can manage. Sleeping in response to stress isn't a uniquely human behavior: many other animals have the same reaction, and it's not clear why. While the circadian sleep that follows the pattern of the clock has been studied extensively, sleep that's triggered by stress is far less understood.
To sleep or not: Researchers explore complex genetic network behind sleep duration
Scientists have identified differences in a group of genes they say might help explain why some people need a lot more sleep -- and others less -- than most. The study, conducted using fruit fly populations bred to model natural variations in human sleep patterns, provides new clues to how genes for sleep duration are linked to a wide variety of biological processes.
Screen time before bed linked with less sleep, higher BMIs in kids
It may be tempting to let your kids stay up late playing games on their smartphones, but using digital devices before bed may contribute to sleep and nutrition problems in children, according to researchers.
Duration of sleep increases and sleeping difficulties decrease after retirement
When people retire from work life, they sleep approximately 20 minutes longer than before retirement. The quality of sleep also improves, as retired people experience less early morning awakenings or nonrestorative sleep, unlike in their last working years.
Lack of sleep could cause mood disorders in teens
Chronic sleep deprivation -- which can involve staying up late, and waking up early for work or school -- has become a way of life for both kids and adults, especially with the increasing use of phones and tablets late into the night. But this social jet lag poses some serious health and mental health risks: new research finds that for teenagers, even a short period of sleep restriction could, over the long-term, raise their risk for depression and addiction.
Restless sleep may be an early sign of Parkinson's disease
Patients with the RBD sleep behavior disorder lack dopamine and have a form of inflammation of the brain, researchers have found. This means that they are at risk of developing Parkinson's disease or dementia when they grow older.
Lithium chloride blunts brain damage linked to fetal alcohol syndrome
A single dose of lithium chloride, a drug used to treat bipolar disease and aggression, blocks the sleep disturbances, memory loss, and learning problems tied to fetal alcohol syndrome, new experiments in mice show.
Brain is still 'connected' during non-REM sleep
When we sleep, our organism goes through different phases of sleep, however the brain remains interconnected during non-REM sleep, which was thought not to happen. This finding has also made it possible to analyze the scientific basis of consciousness, an increasingly important field of neuroscience.
Teens get more sleep when school starts later
A later school start time could mean teens are more likely to get adequate amounts of sleep, according to researchers.
Synthetic cannabis-like drug reduces sleep apnea
A synthetic cannabis-like drug in a pill was safe and effective in treating obstructive sleep apnea in the first large multi-site study of a drug for apnea.
Like a baby: The vicious cycle of childhood obesity and snoring
Scientists looked at the relationships among maternal snoring, childhood snoring and children's metabolic characteristics -- including body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance, which reflects future risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease -- in approximately 1,100 children followed from gestation through early adolescence.
New insights into why sleep is good for our memory
Researchers have shed new light on sleep's vital role in helping us make the most of our memory.
Insomnia linked to alcohol-use among adolescents, study shows
'Parents, educators, and therapists should consider insomnia to be a risk marker for alcohol use, and alcohol use a risk marker for insomnia, among early adolescents,' writes Rutgers-Camden researcher Naomi Marmorstein in the study, published recently in the journal Addictive Behaviors.
Sleep Apnea may increase risk of developing Alzheimer's disease
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may put elderly people at greater risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to new research.
New wake-promoting node pinpointed in brain
Neurologists had suspected that a component of the 'ascending arousal system' could be found supramammillary nucleus, part of the caudal hypothalamus in the brain for more than 100 years. In mice, activating this region using targeted chemical genetic techniques resulted in prolonged wakefulness during the animals' normal sleep periods.
Eating at night could increase risk of heart disease and diabetes
Eating during the night is associated with higher risk of heart disease and diabetes, and the body's 24-hour cycle is to blame, according to recent research.
When you're tired, your brain cells actually slow down
A new study finds that individual neurons slow down when we are sleep deprived, leading to delayed behavioral responses to events taking place around us. The slowdown affects the brain's visual perception and memory associations.
Blame tired brain cells for mental lapses after poor sleep
A new study is the first to reveal how sleep deprivation disrupts brain cells' ability to communicate with each other, leading to mental lapses that affect memory and visual perception.
'Morning larks' have weaker sleep spindles during night than 'night owls'
Individual circadian preference is associated with brain activity patterns during the night, shows new research.
Sleeping through the snoring: Researchers ID neurons that rouse the brain to breathe
A common and potentially serious sleep disorder, obstructive sleep apnea affects at least one quarter of U.S. adults and is linked to increased risk of diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. In a new paper, researchers identified specific neural circuitry responsible for rousing the brain of mice in simulated apnea conditions. The findings could lead to potential new drug therapies to help patients with obstructive sleep apnea get more rest.
Removing digital devices from the bedroom can improve sleep for children, teens
Removing electronic media from the bedroom and encouraging a calming bedtime routine are among recommendations researchers outline in a recent manuscript on digital media and sleep in childhood and adolescence.
Children uniquely vulnerable to sleep disruption from electronic screens
A new article spells out why children and teens are particularly sensitive to the sleep-disrupting impact of electronics.
Severe hot flashes linked to greater risk of obstructive sleep apnea
Many menopausal women complain about poor sleep. Should the problem be blamed simply on menopause or on a more serious underlying sleep disorder such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)£ What, if any, is the connection between hot flashes, which can also lead to cardiovascular risk, and OSA£ New study results examine that relationship.
Sleepwalkers are better at automatic walking
Sleepwalkers who are awake may have a multi-tasking advantage over non-sleepwalkers, according to recent research that uses virtual realilty.
Assaults decrease by 3 percent the Monday after Daylight Saving
Assaults decrease by 3 percent the Monday after the switch to Daylight Saving Time in the spring. In the fall, the opposite takes place, with violence rising by about the same percentage.
Smell sensitivity varies with circadian rhythm
A person's ability to smell may vary throughout the day in accordance with their circadian rhythm, according to new evidence in a small study by researchers who are looking at how sleep may influence eating patterns in teens.
Better sleep, less fear
Higher quality sleep patterns are associated with reduced activity in brain regions involved in fear learning, according to a study of young adults. The results suggest that baseline sleep quality may be a useful predictor of susceptibility to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Physical inactivity and restless sleep exacerbate genetic risk of obesity
Low levels of physical activity and inefficient sleep patterns intensify the effects of genetic risk factors for obesity, according to new results.
More teens than ever aren't getting enough sleep
Researchers found that about 40 percent of adolescents in 2015 slept less than 7 hours a night, which is 58 percent more than in 1991 and 17 percent more than in 2009. They further learned that the more time young people reported spending online, the less sleep they got. Teens who spent 5 hours a day online were 50 percent more likely to not sleep enough than their peers who only spent an hour online each day.
High risk of injury in young elite athletes
Every week, an average of three in every ten adolescent elite athletes suffer an injury. Worst affected are young women, and the risk of injury increases with low self-esteem, especially in combination with less sleep and higher training volume and intensity, research from in Sweden shows.
Anxiety and depression linked to migraines
In a study of 588 patients who attended an outpatient headache clinic, more frequent migraines were experienced by participants with symptoms of anxiety and depression.
Skimping on sleep may contribute to gestational diabetes
A new study has found that lack of sleep among pregnant women may be a contributing factor to the development of gestational diabetes.
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