RSS Dog - RSS To HTML Converter
"Go Fetch!"

Free Online RSS to HTML Converter / Widget Creator

- v2.0.2

Have an RSS feed you want displayed on your site?  This tool is for you!  To use it, just input the RSS feed URL and configure the options and click the button.  The code (HTML, PHP, or JavaScript) will be generated for you at the bottom of the page.  Then just copy/paste that code into your website.  EASY AND FREE!
 

Widget configuration options

URL:
Input here the URL of the RSS feed you want to display on your web site
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 Mode
Server-side Mode Better SEO
Javascript Mode More Universal
 Display Options
Find and display only items containing keyword* Beta
Max items(0=all)
DescriptionsShow / Hide
Limit description to characters (0=no limit)
  if over
Table width
Exclude Title Tag
Show Publish Date
Nofollow LinksAdd nofollow attribute to item links
RSS icon link
Decode from UTF8(Needed sometimes to fix images and formatting)
Hyperlink target:         <a target=" ">
TS:         Text Size
Make complete HTML page (for IFRAME)
Colors (#rrggbb format or "transparent")
Border:
Header Background:
Header Text:
Item Title Background:
Item Title Text:
Item Background:
Item Text:
 
Get The Code

Features:

  • Supports RSS and Atom feed types.
  • Javascript, PHP, or Iframe integration.
  • Configurable output options.

Advanced Style Configuration:

You can configure the output styles using CSS class "rssdog" (PHP and Javascript methods, does not work with Iframe).  For example, to make the font larger, place the following code in your HTML <head> </head> area:

<style type="text/css">
.rssdog {
    font-size:20pt;
}
</style>


Changelog:

v2.0.2

  • Improved multilingual character support. Improved https.

v2.0.1

  • Upgraded Snoopy for better feed compatibility.

v1.9

  • Option to make nofollow links.

v1.8

  • Now supports Twitter RSS.

v1.7

  • Better support for ATOM feeds
  • Added option to include publish date (PubDate).
  • Moved "fetched by" link to right side (less intrusive).
  • Minor text changes

v1.6

  • Added ability to exclude feed title
  • Added ability to filter by keywords

Sites using RSS Dog:

 


Using it

To display the output as you see it, use this URL in your IFRAME or server-side include:
   

Eg, for an iframe, just add the following HTML code to your HTML source:
   

Server-side includes will depend on the language in use on your webserver. Here is example PHP code:
   

No instructions for this mode yet!


Example Output

Shared Links - Twitter - Facebook from Michael_Novakhov (6 sites)
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: The Caribbean Cesspool - The Merger: How Organized Crime is Taking Over the World - Google Search
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .

Russian Mob Or Mafia “Request for Information” – To Inform is to Influence
I’ve reached a point in an investigation where I have to explore the possibility of extra-legal operations in Russia, those operations which have, at least, the tacit approval of the Russian …
Images may be


Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: The Caribbean Cesspool - The Merger: How Organized Crime is Taking Over the World - Google Search
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .



Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: The Caribbean Cesspool - The Merger: How Organized Crime is Taking Over the World - Google Search
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .



Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: The Caribbean Cesspool - The Merger: How Organized Crime is Taking Over the World - Google Search
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .



Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: The Caribbean Cesspool - The Merger: How Organized Crime is Taking Over the World - Google Search
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .



Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: The Caribbean Cesspool - The Merger: How Organized Crime is Taking Over the World - Google Search
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .



Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: How Organized Crime is Taking Over the World: Jeffrey Robinson: Amazon.com: Books
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .

It's not only the free market that is being globalized, but illegal markets as well: transnational crime expert Robinson sounds the alarm in this well-researched and genuinely chilling treatise. Veteran author Robinson (The Laundrymen, etc.) pursues a provocative thesis: where the general public has perceived the influence of traditional crime syndicates as waning, disparate developmentsAprimarily the end of the Cold War and banking's growing reliance on computersAhave made it possible for discrete criminal entities to merge, much like legitimate corporations do. Robinson begins by recounting how "Lucky" Luciano used decentralized business techniques to create La Cosa Nostra in the 1930s; this, the author argues, allowed American organized crime to flourish through the early 1960s, with only sporadic law enforcement victories for years thereafter. Then Robinson plunges into a sordid history of global crime, identifying key players and the labyrinthine attempts by international law enforcement to play "catch-up." Chapters detail the nefarious activities of the Russian "Mafiya," Colombian and Mexican drug cartels, Asian Triads, Japanese Yakuza, Nigerian confidence rings, Hell's Angels, rogue factions of the St. Regis Mohawk tribe and the surviving, leaner and meaner Cosa Nostra (and its Italian relatives). He presents a wealth of evidence that these groups have found ways to accommodate one another in numerous activities worldwideAin identity theft, credit card fraud, smuggling, bribery and counterfeiting, all of which are underwritten by enormous drug profits. More importantly, he explains, the cartels have been able to refine their money laundering, tax evasion and offshore banking crimes. All the while, Robinson provides an exciting and unsettling glimpse of our future as a wired and globalized paradise for thieves. (July) FYI: For more on the Triads, see review above of Martin Booth's The Dragon Syndicates; for more on the Russian Mafiya, see Robert I Friedman's Red Mafiya (Forecasts, May 8).
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.



Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: merger of state and organized crime - Google Search
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Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: merger of state and organized crime - Google Search
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .



Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: merger of state and organized crime - Google Search
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Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: merger of state and organized crime - Google Search
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Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Blogs from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): The FBI News Review: Merger of State and Organized Crime | The Caribbean Cesspool - The Merger: How Organized Crime is Taking Over the World: "Organized crime has become embedded in some Latin American and Caribbean societies to the point of becoming a parallel power..." - 3:17 AM 8/24/2019
"Organized crime has become embedded in some Latin American and Caribbean societies to the point of becoming a parallel power, with interests that overlap with politicians, bureaucrats, and law enforcement officials. The confluence of all these factors defies any simple, conventional response.
That is the perverse reality that many Puerto Ricans and Dominicans are experiencing today. Organized criminal groups have gradually transformed both societies, creating violent, yet resilient political and social orders based on a precarious balance of illicit activities like drug trafficking."



The FBI News Review

Blogs from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites)
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: How Caribbean Organized Crime is Replacing the State
Michael_Novakhov shared this story from InSight Crime.

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In Caribbean locations like the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, criminal groups have established clear-cut alliances with political parties and sectors of the state. By doing so, they are arguably bringing benefits to certain marginalized communities that the state has long proved incapable of serving properly.

Good or evil? When policy-makers and the general public actually pay attention to the debate on the social effects of crime, complex realities tend to be boiled down to this dichotomy.

This dichotomy is why government policies too often entail simplistic measures of suppression in drug-plagued communities. Such a strategy clashes with the reality lived by those most affected by criminal violence: poor and disfranchised populations, living in marginalized neighborhoods.

The problem with this dichotomy is that it obscures any meaningful understanding of a complicated phenomenon. Organized crime has become embedded in some Latin American and Caribbean societies to the point of becoming a parallel power, with interests that overlap with politicians, bureaucrats, and law enforcement officials. The confluence of all these factors defies any simple, conventional response.

That is the perverse reality that many Puerto Ricans and Dominicans are experiencing today. Organized criminal groups have gradually transformed both societies, creating violent, yet resilient political and social orders based on a precarious balance of illicit activities like drug trafficking.

The victory of evil? Yes and no. In both countries, homicide rates have doubled in the last seven years. Yet despite the negative impact of this increased insecurity, these same criminal groups provide opportunities and resources, occasional employment, and protection to those who live in the most-affected neighborhoods. That is something the state has not been able to do, and which elected officials cannot or will not accomplish during their four-year terms in office.

The type of criminality that has penetrated these — and other — Caribbean societies behaves very differently from ordinary street crime. Like plants that are “heliotropic” and always look for sunlight, let’s call this criminal behavior “statetropic.” By that we mean criminal organizations that gear themselves towards the state. Statetropic powerbrokers offer profits to public officials in order to gain their allegiance and protection.

Statetropic criminals prefer a scenario in which both high and low-level civil servants benefit from criminal activities. In turn, this puts the state in the untenable position of enforcing the law, while at the same time serving as an instrument exploited by criminal forces.

Statetropism is a useful term for describing conditions in Latin American and Caribbean democracies, but it manifests itself in different ways. Sometimes the state itself becomes an endorser of alternative political and social orders, by explicitly transferring power to non-state actors. This is the case in Jamaica and Haiti, where criminals groups (posses, yardies, and paramilitary forces) have become part of the political system. These criminal organizations have established clear-cut alliances with political party members and sectors of the state, which in turn transfer welfare resources to local powerbrokers, helping the government establish political control in garrisoned areas.

SEE MORE: Coverage of the Dominican Republic

The phenomenon is now occurring in Puerto Rico as well, in public housing blocks called “cacerios.” Two of the biggest ones in San Juan municipality, Nemesio Canales (1,500 units) and Llorens Torrens (2,000 units), have the highest density concentration of gangs. These criminal gangs played a critical role in allowing former ruling party the New Party for Progress (PNP) to win multiple victories in the last three municipal elections.

Here you have two important types of powerbrokers. On one hand, there are political castes, based on family ties, that inherit the available political spots in most of the municipalities. On the other hand, there are gangs that have carved out territory for themsleves in these enclosed communities. This power sharing between politicians and politicized gangs in these neighborhoods compensates for the weakness of the state, ensuring a tenuous political stability that cuts across several political cliques.

In other cases, the state is so weak that it basically relies on clientilistic relationships with individuals, rather than the gangs. In either case, these individuals and criminal groups end up assuming state-like functions in these socially ostracized communities. They quickly learn how to capitalize on opportunities such as local elections, social protests, and land seizures. They are a daily presence for people’s needs in poor barrios, and sometimes they accomplish these needs in a more consistent and efficient way than politicians do.

It doesn’t necessarily have to be violent actors who assume the basic functions of the state in poor neighborhoods, when the state proves unable to do so. In the Dominican Republic, for example, the state’s inability to provide basic social services and employment — despite repeatedly promising to do so during elections — drew non-violent actors such as non-governmental organizations (NGOs), churches, and community-based organizations to assume those functions. More recently, however, these functions have been taken over by criminal groups.

SEE MORE: Coverage of Jamaica

Is there anything to learn from the way criminals do business, based on these experiences in the Caribbean?

There are a few conclusions we can draw. First, there is the well-developed capacity of criminal groups to adjust to new environments and to change the rules accordingly in these areas. This allows them to create new forms of social control and identify potential alliances in communities that are already socially isolated.

Second, it’s evident that in some ways, these criminal groups become the eyes and the ears of these communities. They know what people want and need, and will take advantage of this as a way to foment loyalty and confidence.

Third, by exercising hard and soft power, they become a type of regulatory power, preventing disorganized street crime from expanding within these communities. At the same time, organized criminal groups become enforcers of social control: mediating disputes, establishing collectively sanctioned forms of behavior among residents, and sometimes protecting them from outside offenders (including abusive police actions). So to speak, organized criminal groups grant protection, in exchange for being protected by the community.

Fourth, these statetropic criminals know to organize themselves as fluid structures, in contrast to the vertical and hierarchal structures adapted by, say, state forces such as police squads. When gangs grant protection to residents in exchange for being shielded by the community, they are breaking the monopoly of power and violence that police and enforcers try to establish in those communities.

Finally, by functioning as a more fluid, elastic organization, they are able to expand into different social groups and foment new partnerships. They are also able to grant recruits incentives to perform their jobs well, and thus maintain loyal ascription to their organization.

These are all functions that criminal organizations perform in impoverished communities, as seen in several Caribbean nations. The very complexity and variety of these functions is precisely what makes it so simplistic to reduce the public debate about organized crime as an issue of “bad gangs” versus “good government.” Even as criminal groups do plenty to destabilize the societies where they operate, it’s also worth bearing in mind that in some areas, they may step in and perform functions that the state has long neglected.

*Lilian Bobea has a Ph.D. from Utrecht University in the Netherlands, and a M.A. from SUNY Binghamton, New York. She is a Caribbean Security specialist and a professor at Bentley University, Massachusetts and FLACSO, Dominican Republic. 

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Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites): mikenov on Twitter: How Caribbean Organized Crime is Replacing the State insightcrime.org/news/analysis/…

How Caribbean Organized Crime is Replacing the State insightcrime.org/news/analysis/…




mikenov on Twitter

Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites)
Blogs from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites): mikenov on Twitter: How Caribbean Organized Crime is Replacing the State insightcrime.org/news/analysis/…

How Caribbean Organized Crime is Replacing the State insightcrime.org/news/analysis/…




mikenov on Twitter

Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites)

Blogs from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites)
Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites): mikenov on Twitter: How Caribbean Organized Crime is Replacing the State insightcrime.org/news/analysis/…

How Caribbean Organized Crime is Replacing the State insightcrime.org/news/analysis/…




mikenov on Twitter

Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites)
Blogs from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites): Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites): mikenov on Twitter: How Caribbean Organized Crime is Replacing the State insightcrime.org/news/analysis/…

How Caribbean Organized Crime is Replacing the State insightcrime.org/news/analysis/…




mikenov on Twitter

Michael Novakhov on Twitter from Michael_Novakhov (4 sites)

Blogs from Michael_Novakhov (21 sites)
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: The Caribbean Cesspool - The Merger: How Organized Crime is Taking Over the World - Google Search
Michael_Novakhov shared this story .

In The Merger International crime expert and author of The Laundrymen Jeffrey Robinson ... the factors that led to these global crime cartels -- digital communication, world markets, the internet ... Getting Connected ... The Caribbean Cesspool.
The merger : the conglomeration of international organized crime. [Jeffrey Robinson] -- "Traces ... Getting Connected -- Detour Through the In-Between World -- The Maffiya -- The B Team -- ... The Caribbean Cesspool -- Bank It Again, Sam --
Jul 23, 2013 - In Caribbean locations like the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, criminal ... Organized criminal groups have gradually transformed both ... More recently, however, these functions have been taken over by criminal groups.
Missing: Cesspool -Merger:
Feb 26, 2019 - Deeply entrenched over decades, organized crime has married with ... and the Caribbean of the International Crisis Group, based in Bogota, Colombia. ..... of the global death toll, took place in Brazil and Colombia.31 In the ...
Missing: Cesspool -Merger:
Jun 18, 2019 - 18 June 2019 - The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), ... Organized Crime in the Caribbean as threat to peace and stability.
Missing: Cesspool -Merger:

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Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠
Michael Novakhov - SharedNewsLinks℠: merger of state and organized crime - Google Search
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