Alternative Medicine News -- ScienceDaily
Drinking Matcha tea can reduce anxiety
Using the 'elevated plus maze' test with mice, researchers have shown that Matcha green tea can reduce anxiety. Their experiments revealed that Matcha's anxiolytic effects are due to the activation of dopamine D1 receptors and certain serotonin receptors. The researchers suggest that adding a little Matcha tea to your diet may improve your health.
Safety concerns: Herbal supplement used to treat addiction and pain
The herb kratom is increasingly being used to manage pain and treat opioid addiction, but new research suggests that it is not safe to use as an herbal supplement.
Widely available antibiotics could be used in the treatment of 'superbug' MRSA
Some MRSA infections could be tackled using widely-available antibiotics, suggests new research from an international collaboration.
Psoriasis patients turn to alternative medicine when traditional treatments fail
A recent survey from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found patients with psoriasis frequently use complementary or alternative therapies to treat their symptoms when traditional treatments fail.
Beta blockers can block the effects of stress and anger in patients prone to emotion-triggered atrial fibrillation
Individuals who are prone to emotion-triggered atrial fibrillation (AF) may benefit from taking beta blockers. A new study shows that beta blockers can block the effects of psychological stress and anger in individuals prone to AF.
Synthetic version of CBD treats seizures in rats
A synthetic, non-intoxicating analogue of cannabidiol (CBD) is effective in treating seizures in rats, according to research by chemists. The synthetic CBD alternative is easier to purify than a plant extract, eliminates the need to use agricultural land for hemp cultivation, and could avoid legal complications with cannabis-related products.
Don't overdo omega-6 fat consumption during pregnancy
New research showed that eating a diet with three times the recommended daily intake of linoleic acid might be harmful in pregnancy.
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