EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health
Study examines prostate cancer treatment decisions
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) A five-year follow-up study of more than 2,000 US men who received prostate cancer treatment is creating a road map for future patients regarding long-term bowel, bladder and sexual function in order to clarify expectations and enable men to make informed choices about care.
Research leads to life changing improvement for some people living with depression
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(University of Calgary) UCalgary researchers have completed a study investigating the effects of two different methods of deep brain stimulation (DBS), short pulse and long pulse, for treatment-resistant depression. The findings showed that both methods of stimulation were equally safe and effective in reducing depressive symptoms. Some study participants have experienced a massive positive change in their lives.
An old plant virus inspires the design of a modern vaccine to fight against malaria
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research) WRAIR scientists demonstrated that a novel, second-generation malaria vaccine candidate based on the tobacco mosaic virus may offer protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Malaria, infecting approximately 228 million individuals in 2018, remains a meaningful threat to public health, regional stability and deploying Service Members. This research shows that the TMV coat protein can also be highly effective as a vaccine scaffold to refocus the host immune system to the most vulnerable epitopes on circumsporozoite protein.
Discovery could help slow down progression of Parkinson's disease
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Rutgers University) A collaboration between scientists at Rutgers University and Scripps Research leads to the discovery of a small molecule that may slow down or stop the progression of Parkinson's disease
A way to look younger is right under your nose, UCLA-led study finds
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) Rhinoplasty, or cosmetic nose surgery, may make a woman look up to three years younger, according to a new study led by researchers at UCLA that used a type of artificial intelligence known as machine learning.
AI can jump-start radiation therapy for cancer patients
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Artificial intelligence can help cancer patients start their radiation therapy sooner -- and thereby decrease the odds of the cancer spreading -- by instantly translating complex clinical data into an optimal plan of attack.
Nanoparticle chomps away plaques that cause heart attacks
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Michigan State University) Michigan State University and Stanford University scientists have invented a nanoparticle that eats away -- from the inside out -- portions of plaques that cause heart attacks.
Effects of contact between minority and majority groups more complex than once believed
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(University of Massachusetts Amherst) For more than 50 years, social scientists and practitioners have suggested that having members of different groups interact with each other can be an effective tool for reducing prejudice. But emerging research points to a more complex and nuanced understanding of the effects of contact between groups, say Linda Tropp at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Tabea Hässler, leader of a multi-national research team based at the University of Zurich, Switzerland.
Stand Up To Cancer announces gastric cancer interception research team
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Stand Up To Cancer) A new SU2C team to intercept gastric cancer, led by Andrew T. Chan, MD, MPH, (Harvard Medical School) and Sandra Ryeom, PhD, (University of Pennsylvania) with researchers from University of Chicago, City of Hope, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Samsung Medical Center (Seoul, Korea) will receive $3MM team to seek biomarkers, such DNA and cells shed from the tumor circulating in the blood system, indicating the presence of gastric cancer.
A brain link to STI/HIV sexual risk
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Data show that young adult women in the United States have high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that increase their risk of HIV. Though epidemiologic and behavioral factors for risk have been studied, we know very little about brain factors that may be linked to STI/ HIV sexual risk.
Study finds association between therapy time, length of stay after hip fracture surgery
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(George Washington University) Researchers in the George Washington University Advanced Metrics Lab found that a hip fracture patient's length of stay in a rehabilitation facility has a greater impact on functional independence than therapy time per day
Gene scissors against incurable muscular disease
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Duchenne type muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common hereditary muscular disease among children, leaving them wheelchair-bound before the age of twelve and reducing life expectancy. Researchers at Technical University of Munich (TUM), Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) and the German Research Center for Environmental Health (Helmholtz Zentrum München) have developed a gene therapy that may provide permanent relief for those suffering from DMD.
Study points to 'unintended consequences' of heavy data surveillance in rugby
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(University of Bath) New research suggests that intense monitoring and surveillance in rugby can lead players to think more about their own results than those of the team.
Unanticipated response to estrogen at the single cell level
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Baylor College of Medicine) A team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine found that not only do individual mammalian cells in a population fail to respond synchronously to estrogen stimulation, neither do individual gene copies, known as alleles.
Human longevity largest study of its kind shows early detection of disease & disease risks
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Merryman Communications) Human Longevity, Inc. (HLI) announced the publication of a ground-breaking study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Study participants were evaluated with Human Longevity's multi-modal precision health platform, the Health Nucleus™. The assessment yielded highly actionable findings, most of which were not previously known, resulting in early identification of disease and disease risk in conditions that can lead to pre-mature mortality in adults.
Stand up to cancer announces initiative to increase diversity in cancer clinical trials
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Stand Up To Cancer) Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) launched a groundbreaking initiative to increase minority representation in cancer clinical trials. New procurement requirements now apply to all future SU2C-supported research grant proposals, requiring applicants to address crucial issues related to recruitment and retention of patients from ethnic groups to improve diverse participation in cancer clinical trials.
Blood pressure drug linked to lower risk of gout
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) A new study led by physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) reports that the antihypertensive drug amlodipine lowered long-term gout risk compared to two other drugs commonly prescribed to lower blood pressure. The findings are published in the Journal of Hypertension.
WVU project sets sights on preventing blindness in diabetic patients
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(West Virginia University) West Virginia University doctors are now at the forefront of detecting diabetic retinopathy, the leading cause of blindness for people ages 20 to 65 in the United States. A WVU program trains primary care clinical staff members across the state to use the Intelligent Retinal Imaging System to quickly capture images of the patient's retinas.
An egg a day not tied to risk of heart disease
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(McMaster University) The controversy about whether eggs are good or bad for your heart health may be solved, and about one a day is fine. A team of researchers from the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences found the answer by analyzing data from three large, long-term multinational studies.
Micro-scaled method holds promise as improved cancer diagnostic platform
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Baylor College of Medicine) A new-method analyzes the combination of tumor genetic material (genomics) with deep protein and phosphoprotein characterization (proteomics) using a single-needle core biopsy from a patient's tumor, providing more detailed information about the cancer than conventional approaches.
Enhancing drug testing with human body-on-chip systems
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) Scientists at Tel Aviv University and Harvard University have devised a functioning comprehensive multi-Organ-on-a-Chip (Organ Chip) platform that enables effective preclinical drug testing of human drug pharmacology.
Protein AKAP8 suppresses breast cancer metastasis
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Baylor College of Medicine) A protein naturally produced in the body has been found to suppress breast cancer metastasis in animal models of human tumors.
The virome of HPV-positive tonsil squamous cell carcinoma and neck metastasis
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(Impact Journals LLC) In this prospective study, a pan-pathogen microarray was used to determine the virome of early stage, p16-positive OPSCC and neck metastasis treated with transoral robotic surgery and neck dissection.
Discovery could lead to new treatment for rare blood disease
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry) A new study shows cancer cells found in the lesions on the skin of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma patients originate from the blood, not the skin as was believed. The protocol to treat the disease was to eliminate the cancer cells from the skin. Based on the findings, researchers believe it would be more effective to treat the malignant clones in the blood rather than waiting until the cells reach the skin and present as lesions.
Most young people do not vape, and even fewer vape regularly
Mon, 27 Jan 2020 00:00:00 EST
(New York University) While youth vaping rates have increased in recent years, most middle and high school students don't vape or smoke and very few vape or smoke daily, finds a study led by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health.
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